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ELECTION DAY/ Fazio (former Representative): Obama still provides hope

November Tue 06, 2012

(Infophoto)  (Infophoto)

“Whoever is elected will have a very similar approach to foreign policy to that of the last four years, particularly in terms of economic policy”, states American politician Victor H. Fazio, elected seven consecutive times to the ranks of the Democrats in the House of Representatives, before deciding not to run for reelection. Instead, Fazio justifies his support of Obama by stating that he is “more comfortable with Obama’s middle class views versus those of Romney, which seem to favor the wealthy”. Romney’s support base comes in large part from social conservatives, who oppose Obama on a number of moral issues. On this point, Fazio states that “the trend line is clearly in the direction of a more diverse country, and therefore one that favors the Democrats”.

Mr.
Fazio, how will the U.S. policy towards Europe change after today’s vote?
I do not anticipate any significant changes in American foreign policy with respect to what we have seen in the last four years. Emphasis will be placed mainly on the economic recovery and that applies across the global. I hope that there will be a growing economic coordination between the European Union and the United States. From this point of view, I do not expect any great change in the way we have attempted to coordinate monetary policy and, with much less success, in our fiscal policy.

Do you mean that the foreign policy of Obama and Romney is identical?
I think there is very little difference, though I think Romney has been trying to portray bigger differences than those that really exist. Whoever is elected will have a very similar approach to foreign policy, particularly in terms of economic policy. Romney has made a big deal out of China, and America’s indebtedness to China, Chinese currency manipulation, etc. In the past, for Romney, that has been more of a political ploy than a policy, however, and I do not think there has been any significant difference in terms of Europe.

For
Obama's America, is Europe a positive or negative model?
One thing we do not want to do is pursue the plan of austerity that we have seen in Europe. I think we realize that the economies of the world are still short of demand, and that therefore austerity can be counterproductive.



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